Phyllostachys 'Shanghai 3'

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Phyllostachys 'Shanghai 3'

Post autor: Sobal » 13 wrz 2004 19:32

Phyllostachys 'Shanghai 3'

Nowa odmiana.

Maksymalna wysokość: 9 m
Maksymalna średnica: 8-9 cm
Minimalna temperatura: -20 C

Phyllostchys Shanghai 3 wygląda zupełnie jak Ph. Iridescens tylko nie ma pasków na łodydze - jest jasnozielona.

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Re: Phyllostachys 'Shanghai 3'

Post autor: Sobal » 01 cze 2005 14:16

Mogę dodać, z sadzonek w tym roku miały wyraźnie najgrubsze pędy. Bardzo żywotny: zeszłoroczny, półmetrowy krzaczek wypuszcza pędy grubości kciuka, które w chwili obecnej mają u mnie już ponad 2 metry. Ciekawe jak będzie z mrozoodpornością...


Fot. Pavel Rezl

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Pochodzenie?

Post autor: Tarma » 09 lis 2005 12:22

Witam
Czy Ph. sp, Shanghai 3 nie pochodzi jako siewka od Ph. vivax?Kto pierwszy użył nazwy Ph. sp. Shanghai 3?W jakim to było kraju?
http://www.kimmei.com/pu/pu05.htm
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Re: Pochodzenie?

Post autor: Sobal » 09 lis 2005 14:35

Tarma pisze:Witam
Czy Ph. sp, Shanghai 3 nie pochodzi jako siewka od Ph. vivax?Kto pierwszy użył nazwy Ph. sp. Shanghai 3?W jakim to było kraju?
http://www.kimmei.com/pu/pu05.htm
Pozdrawiam Tarma
Tu jest tłumaczenie tego textu z holenderskiego na angielski:

Confusion about Phyllostachys vivax
A bamboo that more scarce in Europe than we think, is the green form of Phyllostachys vivax. About 6 to 7 years ago, this species was imported from China in large numbers. At least, that was what growers assumed. In the meantime, it has become clear that a range of new species have been imported with very few, or perhaps even no real Ph. vivax. One species occurred in larger numbers and I gave it the provisional name Shanghai 2. This bamboo resembled Ph. vivax as a rapid grower, but the leaves were smaller and less arching. The early yellowish shoots looked rather like Ph. dulcis. A detailed study of pictures of the shoots of this plant in the "Compendium of Chinese Bamboo" as well as other sources and examples removed most of our doubts. These plants withstood very low temperatures (down to -19°C or -2°F) very well, contrary to Ph. vivax. This species had to be the real Ph. dulcis that could also survive the harsh winters of Beijing. This also means that the bamboo previously distributed in Europe from the US under the name of Ph. dulcis cannot be the real species or is another clone and should be placed with the other Phyllostachys sp., the species without names.

Also, the closely related and perhaps even more striking species without name: Shanghai 3, imported under the name of Ph. propinqua, belongs to the tallest and thickest of the hardy species. The deep green young culms have short internodes at the base. The new shoots are reddish-pink with spots. Identification seems to direct us to Ph. iridescens, but it is wiser to keep the provisional name Shanghai 3.


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historia gatunków

Post autor: Sobal » 10 lis 2005 10:47

Zresztą to bardzo ciekawy tekst jednego z pionierów hodowli bambusów w Europie. Jest tu dużo informacji na temat powstania obecnie popularnych gatunków.
http://www.kimmei.com/pu/pu23.htm
New Introductions


About 15 years ago, naming bamboo was a relatively easy task. Pseudosasa japonica, Fargesia murieliae and Phyllostachys nigra were multiplied from mother plants introduced in Europe by the first growers and collectors. Back then, we knew precisely how to identify these species and first attempts were initiated to map new introductions. We assumed that all species of the bamboo family could be placed clearly and unambiguously in a logical system of classification.

After more introductions from China and Japan however, we learned that the task of naming and classifying bamboos was more problematic than originally considered. After the opening up of China, various species collected from the wild reached Europe. These new introductions certainly did not contribute to a better overview. Despite serious attempts to provide detailed descriptions of species, more and more bamboos seemed to be something different.

This limitation is perhaps seen most clearly in the offspring of the once omnipresent and familiar Fargesia murieliae. At first, we knew which characteristics to look for in identifying this species. Now, the height of the new generation varies from 50 cm (19 inches) to up to 5m (161/2 feet). There are various types without the typical powdered culms of the original species. Reddish or green colours on the sheaths are seen. There are various types that perform well in deep shadow, but also selections that can grow well in sunlight. If we did not know their origin, we could easily be bamboozled and 'select' four or five new species. In a similar way, various species have been named in the bamboo world that do not deserve this status. Each botanist can easily connect his or her name to the introduction of a new species.

In fact, as with Rhododendrons, we should return to a classification that is much less rigorous. We should think more in terms of groups and types to classify bamboos, and when more becomes known about the relationships among the types through DNA-fingerprinting, attempts could then be made to delimit such groupings.

For example, it can be expected that in the enormous wild resources of the species Phyllostachys glauca giants as well as dwarfs will occur, along with arching and erect types. Some of these could prove to be extremely hardy, whereas others are barely able to withstand some frost. If all wild species would inherently have such large variation, perhaps we will have to discard the current methods for determination and identification.

In reality, various superior selections from wild resources have been cultivated in China for consumption of edible shoots, or for building materials. After a period of flowering selections have been made from seedlings, these have been given names, thereby reaching the status of a species name in our times, often unjust.

Hybrids pose even greater difficulties. Crosses between various species occur more often in nature than we might expect. The hybrid identity of a number of bamboos like Hibanobambusa tranquillans and Semiarundinaria has been unveiled. Various species of these bamboos still have the status of a species, but even Sasaella is considered a hybrid by the French botanist Demoly.

In their natural environment, hybrids often perform better than the individual parent species through an optimal mix of parental qualities. Such sterile species can colonize areas for a long time without contributing to evolution by producing offspring. Perhaps the long intervals between flowering periods are in part an evolutionary adaptation to avoid such hybrids. Nevertheless, such types can of course be valuable or interesting for us.

Several of the recently introduced bamboos have to be labelled with 'sp.' or 'species' because they cannot be classified correctly. To avoid having too many species something will have to be done. Semiarundinaria sp. Korea has been in use as a name ever since I started with bamboo. Also, Arundinaria fangiana or Tungchuan 2 will have to live with its provisional name, and many more have joined the party since.

Fargesia sp.
Among the various new introductions that have reached us, some bamboo species immediately attract attention, but only later are their secrets revealed. This is the case with one bamboo in particular.
In the spring of 1997, a broken box arrived at my place containing some bamboos collected from the wild. Various large clumps with relatively thick culms took up part of the space. Some culms had a diameter of more than 2 cm (3/4 inch). On the labels we read Fargesia scabrida. My colleague Hans Prins and I looked for the description of this species, but the thick culms did not seem to fit the description, or perhaps this could have been a giant among the scabridas. According to our collector in China, these plants had been found at an elevation of 2,700 m (8,858 feet) in Pingwu in Northern Sichuan, a site where plants should be considerably hardy.

From the base of these culms several small shoots developed in the first year displaying small and elegant leaves. It took a complete growing season for the plants to adapt, but early in next spring, large shoots had developed. One plant was planted outdoors, and in late summer several new shoots came up and side branches developed quite rapidly. The strong colour contrast between the orange-brown culm-sheaths and the young purple culms was especially spectacular. The following winter was not very cold with only minus 12°C (10°F) and the plants did not suffer at all. The winters that followed were not very cold either, but in southern Germany the plants withstood frosts down to -18°C (0°F) without too much damage. At Max Riedelsheimer's place, the winter of 2000/2001 was too severe for a young plant. My guess is that the hardiness is comparable with the small leaved form of Fargesia robusta. Like Fargesia robusta, new shoots of this new bamboo develop rather early. If we should decide to group bamboos, these two would certainly be placed together.

One important difference from Fargesia robusta is the long slender leaf and the beautiful gracious arrangement of the leaves. After about three years of growth the bamboo has almost reached 4m (13 feet). If we consider the culm width of 2cm, this bamboo will develop into a giant Fargesia, and will (perhaps) someday get its own name.

Fargesia sp. Jiuzhaigou
In recent years a number of important new introductions of Fargesia nitida and related types have been imported into Europe. The German pharmacist Stephan Wagner collected the most striking and perhaps the most beautiful form of all, around 1986. He found this bamboo as a seedling at the Jiuzhaigou Park (Garten Praxis 3/1999) in Northern Sichuan. Chinese researchers had already mentioned Fargesia nitida was flowering in this area, but the plant did not fit the species description at all. However, when we take into account the natural variation within the species and thereby enlarging the frame of reference, this bamboo belongs to the group of Fargesia nitida. Meanwhile, alongside the provisional name Fargesia sp. Jiuzhaigou 1 other names like Fargesia nitida 'Jiuzhaigou', Fargesia nitida aff. 'Jiuzhaigou' and Fargesia sp. 'Jiu' are being used for this bamboo.

Later on, it turned out that Mr. Wagner had collected more than one seedling and he let these seedlings all grow into one plant. The first and most widely distributed clone, Fargesia sp. Jiuzhaigou 1, has been propagated from only one vital part of this 'compound' plant.

One important difference from Fargesia nitida is that the culm-sheaths fall on the ground already within the first year, thereby revealing the deep green culms beneath. This green colour can change into a deep red by the sun the following spring and even to orange yellow in the summer sun. The small graceful leaves appear to belong to frost-sensitive Himalayan bamboo species, but the plant is hardy to very hardy. Sometimes, the leaf edges dry under the influence of sun, frost and wind. The growth habit is quite erect, reaching heights of 2 to 3m (7 to 10 feet). When the soil is not too dry, this bamboo can stand full sun. Added to this, flowering is still a lifetime away. This bamboo proves that the range of possibilities and improvements within the Fargesia group is quite large.

From the same park, M. Laferrere of France has collected another seedling: Fargesia sp. Jiuzhaigou 2. As far as we can tell, the culms of this bamboo lack the deep dark red coloration and they are more widely spaced.

Fargesia sp. Jiuzhaigou 3 to 10 are seedlings that were collected by R. Willumeit in this region. These show even more of the variation within the species. A Swiss person has collected another specimen and it is called Fargesia jiuzhaigou 'Genf'. It grows well and also shows good red colouring.

Fargesia 'Rufa'
In the spring of 1995, I received a fax sent from the Botanical Garden of Shanghai, asking if I would be interested in specific bamboos. A staff member of the Botanical Garden had collected two bamboos in the south of the Chinese province Ganzhu. These plants were collected at elevations of 1,800 to 2,500m (5,900 to 8,200 feet) at latitude 34°20 N and longitude 106°00 E.
Here the average annual temperature is 8°C (46°F), and temperatures go down to -16.8°C (0°F) in winter. During the summer, the highest temperature can be 29.6°C (85°F).

We decided to call these plants Gansu 95-1 and Gansu 95-2 for the time being. The young plants of Gansu 95-1 grew amazingly well. In the first winter, it was observed that the leaves did not curl in dry conditions, during frosts or in direct sunlight, unlike the leaves of Fargesia nitida and Fargesia murieliae. Even the shedding of leaves, as is usual preceding winter with most Fargesias, was limited. This bamboo had no difficulty at all with the severe winter of 96/97, when temperatures went down to -19°C (-3°F) with the graceful leaves remaining green. Only extended periods of very low temperature with dry continental winds are endured less well by this bamboo than by the leaf-rolling types.

Already in April new shoots appear, which is in fact too early for the young shoots, which are sensitive to late frost. The height of the culms is between 2 and 3 m and because of the large number of leaves the culms arch over. New culms develop about 5-15 cm from the plant so after 5 years the plants can attain a diameter of up 2 m. This bamboo takes up available space at least three times as quick as Fargesia murieliae. In fact this bamboo would look its best in parks and large gardens, adding a fine touch to these places. The deep green leaves and the plant's full silhouette stand in dynamic contrast to more static plants like Rhododendrons, cherry laurel and yew.

Naming the new plants
Our friends in China who sent us the plants proposed the name Fargesia spathacea. However, this name had already been assigned unjustly to Fargesia murieliae and later on to Fargesia nitida, and this time too, it did not fit.

In southern Gansu only a few bamboo species are found. The plant certainly was not Yushania confusa and we already knew Fargesia dracocephala. Then we came to Fargesia rufa. The visual resemblance with the two pictures of this species in the most important Chinese bamboo book 'A Compendium of Chinese Bamboo' and also the region of origin pointed in this direction. From then on, when the plants were distributed among growers and collectors this name started to lead its own life. When we study this species in more detail, we find characteristics of both Fargesia dracocephala and Fargesia rufa, both species being native to this region. It should be clear that bamboos from natural resources do not easily fit our classification systems.

My proposal is to name this bamboo Fargesia 'Rufa', given its already widely known name. Not only does the name sound well, but also when in the future the species should be known more exactly, the species name can easily be placed between the generic name Fargesia and the cultivar name 'Rufa'. Gansu 2 was also a nice bamboo, but it turned out to be a shade tolerant form of Fargesia nitida, and it did not grow much higher than 2m (61/2 feet).

Phyllostachys parvifolia and other giants
How important are the introductions of new species of bamboo in times of plenty? Perhaps the variation within the genus Fargesia is only the tip of the iceberg! If one considers the vast number of Phyllostachys species and varieties, one would be tempted to think that all possible variations are included. A number of new species add some variation to the existing range, but they are not hardier than Phyllostachys aureosulcata, they do not grow taller than Ph. vivax, and their colours are not more spectacular than the colours observed in varieties of both Ph. aureosulcata and Ph. vivax. Most of the new introductions resemble in some way plants we already know. However, there are exceptions. Species that may enlarge and improve the current assortment of species and cultivars of Phyllostachys:

Phyllostachys kwangsiensis
This species is supposed to be native to Taiwan, which has a relatively warm climate. This is why people did not expect too much from its winter-hardiness and it also explains why such little effort was put into importing and testing material of this species. Nevertheless, this bamboo is hardy to very hardy. Perhaps it originated in colder parts of China and was introduced to the island later. Even more remarkable is its resemblance to Phyllostachys pubescens. The hairy young culms, along with several other characteristics, suggest that Ph. kwangsiensis is just a hardy form of the Chinese giant bamboo, which does not grow well at all in Western Europe. We would then have at last a 'Pubescens' that will grow well in cooler summers. This bamboo still has to prove itself on various points, but it inspires our fantasy as a possible alternative to the giants of Prafrance.

Confusion about Phyllostachys vivax
A bamboo that more scarce in Europe than we think, is the green form of Phyllostachys vivax. About 6 to 7 years ago, this species was imported from China in large numbers. At least, that was what growers assumed. In the meantime, it has become clear that a range of new species have been imported with very few, or perhaps even no real Ph. vivax. One species occurred in larger numbers and I gave it the provisional name Shanghai 2. This bamboo resembled Ph. vivax as a rapid grower, but the leaves were smaller and less arching. The early yellowish shoots looked rather like Ph. dulcis. A detailed study of pictures of the shoots of this plant in the "Compendium of Chinese Bamboo" as well as other sources and examples removed most of our doubts. These plants withstood very low temperatures (down to -19°C or -2°F) very well, contrary to Ph. vivax. This species had to be the real Ph. dulcis that could also survive the harsh winters of Beijing. This also means that the bamboo previously distributed in Europe from the US under the name of Ph. dulcis cannot be the real species or is another clone and should be placed with the other Phyllostachys sp., the species without names.

Also, the closely related and perhaps even more striking species without name: Shanghai 3, imported under the name of Ph. propinqua, belongs to the tallest and thickest of the hardy species. The deep green young culms have short internodes at the base. The new shoots are reddish-pink with spots. Identification seems to direct us to Ph. iridescens, but it is wiser to keep the provisional name Shanghai 3.

New variations
An important new and stable variety of Phyllostachys vivax originated as a mutation of Ph. vivax 'Aureocaulis'. This mutation occurred at about the same time in my own nursery and in the nursery of Hans Prins, and perhaps, who knows, in other places too. As with Ph. aureosulcata 'Spectabilis' and Ph. bambusoides 'Castillonis', the sulcus is green and the rest of the culm is yellow. It is in fact the inverse form of Ph. vivax 'Huanwenzhu'. Hence the provisional (and too long) name Ph. vivax 'Huanwenzhu-inversa', because this form originated from Ph. vivax 'Aureocaulis' we can assume a similar winter hardiness.

Phyllostachys parvifolia
A more recent Phyllostachys species has been intriguing me for some years now, due to its growth, its appearance and its winter hardiness. This bamboo is called Phyllostachys parvifolia. In fact, it is hard to believe that this species has only become available now and only in small numbers. Years ago this bamboo had already been introduced from China, but for some reason it never entered the circuit of collectors and growers of bamboo, although a form of Ph. nuda with smaller leaves has carried this name unjustly.

The name parvifolia points to the small leaves that make this bamboo the shining star. The fine structure of the leaves gives it a cloud-like appearance. The new shoots are easily recognized, like long slender javelins, they emerge from the soil at the end of June to early July. They are initially slightly oblique, but when they grow taller, they become erect. The culms have powdered rings under the nodes, like Ph. nuda. From a distance, this species resembles 'Henon's bamboo', Phyllostachys nigra 'Henonis', but the culms are comparatively thicker and the leaves are smaller.

During the last cold winter of 96/97, even -19°C (-2°F) did not damage the young culms of what was then a small and delicate plant in my garden. The leaves remained completely green in contrast to various other bamboos like Phyllostachys nigra 'Henonis' growing at the same spot. A young specimen of Ph. parvifolia in the garden of Max Riedelsheimer in Stockdorf near Munich survived the winter of 1999/2000 with even less leaf damage than for example Ph. aureosulcata and Ph. bissetii. For short periods, temperatures dropped as low as -20°C (-3°F). Meanwhile, my specimen has grown taller than 7m. (23 feet) after 7 years of growth. The growth is less explosive than that of Ph. vivax for example, but the culm wall is much thicker and hence much stronger.

Picture of the future
In England Ph. parvifolia has been named the Ph. pubescence of the north before. This is mainly due to the shape of the leaves and its general resemblance to Ph. pubescences. Perhaps Ph. parvifolia with its small leaves and Ph. kwangsiensis with its hairy culms can bring some of the magic of the most striking bamboo of all, Phyllostachys pubescens, to the north.

Jos van der Palen
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Ostatnio zmieniony 14 lis 2005 14:24 przez Sobal, łącznie zmieniany 1 raz.

misio
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Re: historia gatunków

Post autor: misio » 14 lis 2005 12:19

Sobal pisze:...
Wiecie, że Phyllostachys vivax jest mutacją Phyllostachys vivax 'Aureocaulis'?
...
Z tekstu to chyba nie wynika. Mowa jest o Ph. vivax Huanwenzhu-inversa.

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Re: historia gatunków

Post autor: Sobal » 14 lis 2005 13:47

Masz rację... Nie doczytałem... :oops:
Już poprawiam...
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Post autor: Lukas » 14 lis 2005 21:30

na tym jednym zdjeciu jest podobny do lucky bamboo :D tam gdzie ma taka zielona lodyge ;]
Lukas

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Post autor: Sobal » 15 lis 2005 09:50

Lukas pisze:na tym jednym zdjeciu jest podobny do lucky bamboo :D tam gdzie ma taka zielona lodyge ;]
Tak wyglądał całe lato - "zielony groszek". Teraz trochę wypłowiał...
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Post autor: calvi » 15 lis 2005 15:45

Lukas pisze:na tym jednym zdjeciu jest podobny do lucky bamboo :D tam gdzie ma taka zielona lodyge
Fakt, że wiele naszych bambusów jeszcze długo będzie bardziej przypominało wierzbowe krzaki niż bambus.
Jedna z ciotek z podkrakowskiej wsi kiedy zobaczyła te moje bambusy,
spytała, czemu żeśmy nasadzili tyle "ispiny"
(ispa to w lokalnej gwarze rodzaj nadrzecznych zarośli).

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Ph. propinqua

Post autor: Tarma » 05 gru 2005 12:31

Witam
Czym różnią się Ph. propinqua od Ph.sp. Shangchai 3 ? Obydwa bambusy są jasnozielone.Może to ta sama roślina,a różni się nazwą tylko z powodów handlowych?
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Re: Ph. propinqua

Post autor: Artur » 05 gru 2005 21:50

Tarma pisze:Witam
Czym różnią się Ph. propinqua od Ph.sp. Shangchai 3 ? Obydwa bambusy są jasnozielone.Może to ta sama roślina,a różni się nazwą tylko z powodów handlowych?
Pozdrawiam Tarma
Jest wiele bambusów zielonych trudnych do rozpoznania na pierwszy rzut oka. Shanghai 3 od Ph. propinqua różni się kolorem wychodzących pędów.
Kolory Shanghai 3 masz na początku wątku . Natomiast Ph. propinqua jest tutaj http://www.bambusarium.cz/foto/displayi ... m=3&pos=45.
Pozdrowienia z Wrocławia http://www.ArtBambo.prv.pl

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Post autor: Sobal » 12 maja 2007 22:06

Dobrze przetrwał tą łagodną zimę (był pod śniegiem w ten najgorszy wietrzny weekend). Jest dość mały po poprzedniej zimie 20-lecia. Na razie nie wypuścił nowych pędów. Ale dopiero ruszył po zimie bo zaczęły mu rosnąć nowe liście później niż innym.

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Post autor: calvi » 15 maja 2007 15:50

Sobal pisze:Dobrze przetrwał tą łagodną zimę (był pod śniegiem w ten najgorszy wietrzny weekend). Jest dość mały po poprzedniej zimie 20-lecia. Na razie nie wypuścił nowych pędów. Ale dopiero ruszył po zimie bo zaczęły mu rosnąć nowe liście później niż innym.
Mój wypuścił bardzo wolno jeden pęd, na razie ok. 4cm nad ziemią.

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